Toronto

Toronto: Baseball, Beyoncé and Baby Pandas

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My recent jaunt to the 6 (Toronto, for the uninitiated) included wondrous and diverse activities.

My Chipotle obsession continued. Three visits during my five-day stay. Unsurprisingly, my beloved first-place (at the time) Red Sox lost in spectacular fashion. Always great to be kitted out in full Sox regalia while being chirped by 50,000 petulant bandwagon-jumping Jays fans. (more…)

Toronto: Weekend getaway

 

The trip began with us being marooned for 2½ hours on the 401 and was followed with the unsurprising yet disconcerting demolishment of my beloved Red Sox. Thankfully, this Toronto getaway was heavily punctuated by food. So let’s focus on that, shall we?

To no one’s surprise I am obsessed with all things Momofuku, starting with the sculpture that jets dramatically from the ground near the entrance. Chinese artist Zhang Huan took two years to complete “Rising,” which has “peace pigeons” moving up the building’s facade and twisted tree branches that are meant to resemble the body of a dragon.

Drinks were had at Nikai, a bar and lounge located in a glass cube on the second floor of Momofuku. The cocktails are grouped into sparkling, stirred, shaken and classic twists. We indulged in Paper Plane (bourbon, lemon, aperol, amaro), Royal Bermuda (rum, lime, falernum),  Sunrise and Sunset (amaro, cream soda) and an Alberta premium dark horse whiskey—all refreshing and delicious.

A walk down the stairs brought us to Momofuku Noodle Bar for dinner. Up first were the Pork Buns—they are what dreams are made of. Fluffy pillows of bread enveloped around soft pork belly, stuffed with tangy pickled cucumbers, scallions and a dollop of hoisin sauce. It is a well-thought-out combinations of flavours and textures. The Momofuku Ramen has shredded pork shoulder, creamy pork belly, green onions, a soft poached egg and fish cakes floating on tender noodles and submerged in the most delicious broth. After dinner, I snuck back upstairs to Momofuku Milk Bar for some take-away dessert—Crack Pie, a lavish object of my desire. Believe me when I tell you that this pie is good. Once you start eating this rich-sweet-salty-buttery-silky creation, you won’t be able to stop.

I then joined the rest of my peeps next door at the Shangri-La Hotel Lobby Lounge. The 90-seat Lobby Lounge is an urban living room. Natural light streams through two-storey windows that highlight large paintings, sculptures and an Italian handcrafted Fazioli piano set amid contemporary sofas and chairs. It was a particular frigid summer day so we huddled around the fireplace and had drinks and sipped on fancy tea (there are 68 different types to choose from).  I loved lingering at this Tony hotel lounge. It felt like we had run away to a sumptous and sophisticated hideaway.

And with that, our weekend had concluded. As if on cue, our drive home left us stranded yet again, this time for a shorter period. Thoughts of steaming pork buns swirled around in my head and occupied the idol time. Toronto, Shangri-La, Momofuku—can’t wait till I see you again.

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A weekend escape to T.O., part 2

CN Tower, Toronto

Sometimes I just need to escape to the big city. True, it comes with some headaches like snarling traffic and unruly crowds. But the benefits of being in a metropolis far outweigh the liabilities. If only to get me out of my food slump.

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Chipotle, Chipotle, how do I love thee? I may seem strange to profess ones love to a fast food restaurant but considering the jam-packed Yonge street location, I am not alone in my adoration of the burrito bowl. And like long-distance lovers reunited after a lengthy time apart, it was oh so sweet. I long for the day when we can once again be together. Chipotle, it wouldn’t hurt you to save me some gas money and move to my neck of the woods. I love thee but how much do you love me?

Chiptole, Yonge Street Toronto Yonge Street, TorontoYonge Street, Toronto Yonge Street, Toronto

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A Weekend Escape to T.O.

A mere four hours drive from where I reside, Toronto always holds the promise of adventure and escape from the everyday. It’s a juggernaut of money, culture, sports and beautiful people. And for a few times a year, I make it my personal playground!

Some restaurants in Toronto far exceed their peers. Amid all if its 8,000 dinning establishments, David Chang’s Momofuku is my favourite. The Noodle Bar in particular. It’s tucked neatly next to the Shangri-La Hotel on University Ave.

Let’s talk about the food. Ah, the food. The Momofuku Ramen has shredded pork shoulder, creamy pork belly, green onions, a soft poached egg and fish cakes floating on tender noodles and submerged in the most delicious broth. The clam noodles included said clams, scallions, miso, noodles, the delicous broth as well as a heaping spoonful of chilis. If you are heat-averse, this isn’t the dish for you. The Momofuku Pork Buns are what foodie-dreams are made of. Fluffy pillows of bread enveloped around soft pork belly, stuffed with pickled cucumbers, scallions and a dollop of hoisin sauce. Upstairs is Momofuku Milk Bar which is more of a glassed-in walk-in-fridge than a bar. Still, it contains Crack Pie, a lavish object of my desire. Believe me when I say that I would shatter the glass walls to get my hands on that pie. Once you start eating this rich-sweet-salty-buttery-silky pie, you won’t be able to stop. I am for sure, addicted.

clam noodles – miso, chili, scallion
momofuku ramen – pork belly & shoulder, fish cake, egg
steamed pork buns – pork belly, hoisin, cucumbers, scallions


Crack Pie
Chocolate Malt Cake Truffles

Momofuku Noodle Bar on Urbanspoon

Momofuku Milk Bar on Urbanspoon

Another gustatory obsession of mine is Chipotle Mexican Grill. The ingredients are laid out in front of you so you get to choose the perfect combo to assemble the perfect meal. Take for instance the burrito bowl. Served in a bowl (hence the name, clever, eh?) you get your choice of cilantro-lime rice, pinto or black beans, meat (braised carnitas or barbacoa, adobo-marinated and grilled chicken or steak) or guacamole, salsa and cheese or sour cream. Chipotle describes it as “a burrito in a bowl and filled with dreams.” Speaking of burrito, the Chipotle Burrito is also what dreams are made of. A flour tortilla stuffed with your choice of the above burrito-bowl ingredients. Not sure why Chipotle has not yet expanded to Ottawa. My friends and family could keep the company afloat with our healthy appetites alone. Chipotle, come to Ottawa, already!

Burrito Bowl
Burrito

Chipotle Mexican Grill on Urbanspoon

Eating out is grand but eating-in can be just as satisfying. Especially when someone else is doing the cooking. Lucky for me, my pal’s family is always up for playing gracious hosts. One night we were served a savory dish of Kale with Balsamic Vinaigrette and Meatballs alongside a spectacular Mango-Coconut Quinoa Salad. I loved everything but went back for seconds for the salad. Dressed in sweet balsamic and lime juice, and loaded with tons of fruits and vegetables, this salad was a standout. There’s something about the kindness and thoughtfulness put into a meal that makes everything taste better. Not to get all lovey but I’m lucky and grateful to have these people in my life, if only for a few weekends a year.

Kale with Balsamic Vinaigrette and Meatballs

The real reason behind our TO escapde was to be amongst my beloved Red Sox who were in town to play the Jays. It was my first ball game of the season. I love the sights and sounds of baseball. The crack of the bat, the scent of hot dogs in the air, the cheering fans. It was cool to see Big Papi and Peddey. And the Sox won both games. Good times. Although the poor guy sitting near us who got carried out on a strecher by the medics may have had a bit too much of a good time.

Other than seeing the Red Sox win, the highlight of the trip was taking in the breathtaking Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada, located adjacent to the CN Tower.

The Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada is 12,500-square-metres with 5.7-million litres of marine and freshwater habitats from across the world. The website states that the aquarium has more than 13,500 exotic sea and freshwater creatures, comprising more than 450 species.

Everywhere you looked it was a fish frenzy. The most stunning part of the aquarium was the Dangerous Reef exhibit, which has a 96-metre-long moving sidewalk (the longest in North Amercia) through an acrylic tunnel deep below the 2.84-million litre Shark Lagoon, a habitat occupied by 3 to 3.7-metre-long sand tiger sharks, largetooth sawfish and green sea turtles. It felt like we were submerged in the ocean. Sick. Yes, I’m gushing but upon visiting, you’ll understand. The aquarium is a wonder all to itself. You must go. NOW!

And that with that, a fitting end to our Toronto excursion. Lots of fantastic food, kind family, the Sox, and a very cool aquarium. Thanks T Dot. Till next time!

Momofuku TO truly inspires

Nowadays, it seems that many chefs are full-fledged brands first, cooks second. Money-printing machines armed with theme restaurants, much hyped cookbooks and TV shows. IMHO, many of these “rock star chefs” are undeserving of the spotlight and often tarnished by too much celebrity, too many product endorsements and simply too much hype. The focus on cooking appears to have gotten lost somewhere along the way.

I wish I had the superpower to bestow some of the chefs in my own life with fame, fortune and a cookware line. Case in point, my buddy’s mom. Recently, my taste buds were taken to heaven by her deconstructed lasagna. The dish was pure, authentic and skillfully presented. A true culinary experience, yet one that goes unrecognized but for the acclaim from the lucky few in her entourage (count me in as one of her fans).

But not all celebrity chefs are publicity-seeking and image obsessed. I’ve always had much reverence for Chef David Chang and his ability to maintain a strong sense of self and emphasize food over fame. He grew up working in his father’s bistros in D.C. He trained at the French Culinary Institute before taking jobs at various prestigious establishments. Working at local ramen shops in Japan led to him eventually starting his own restaurant, Momofuku. He now presides over a culinary empire that has been the recipient of two Michelin stars and numerous James Beard awards. For months, I talked everyone’s ear off about my upcoming trip to Momofuku TO, his newest venture. And now, here I was. About to feast on the cuisine of an artist.

The restaurant is fascinating. An odd tree-like sculpture hovers near its street-level entrance. Once inside, the split-level space is extremely unpretentious and dominated by minimalist design in muted tones. Tables with backless stools, towering ceilings, stone and glass complete the look. It’s clear from the outset that this design was deliberate. The focus is on the food.

Ah, the food. We dined on heavenly pork buns. Juicy and tender meat wrapped in soft, pillowy dough garnished with a dollop of hoisin and topped with cucumbers and scallions. Next up, my friend had ginger scallion noodles with shiitake, cucumber and cabbage and I tried the dan dan mein, spicy pork, dry scallops, and peanuts over noodles. I was fascinated by the well-thought-out combinations of flavours and textures. I simply admire the way he creates dishes, building from tradition and adding a simple spin to create blissful works of food art. It’s hardly an overstatement to say that a meal at Momofuku was one of a higher order than any I’d ever had before and one the best I’ve had in my life.

Chef Chang and my buddy’s mom have much in common. They both have a passion and commitment to bring joy and comfort to their people through food. They both inadvertently inspire. And they both do it without a cookware line. That’s admirable.

momofuku to – 190 university avenue, toronto, on

pork buns – hoisin, scallion, cucumber
kimchi / pickles

ginger scallion noodles – shiitake, cucumber, cabbage
dan dan mein – spicy pork, dry scallop, peanut


crack pie and compost cookies
crack pie

Momofuku Noodle Bar on Urbanspoon

Toronto, TIFF and the Red Sox

I visit Toronto three or four times a year, mostly when my beloved Red Sox are in town. This time around, we took in a couple games, went to TIFF, did some shopping, eating and spent time with family. Having taken pics aplenty, I thought I’d change things up and subject you to a photo collage from my T.O. getaway. Hope it’s not too painful!

TIFF Bell Lightbox
Best Screenplay and Best Picture Oscars for “Crash” on display at TIFF
Waiting among the masses to get into the theatre
Under the Winter Garden Theatre lights
My ticket for “Song for Marion”
Choice balcony seats
“Song for Marion” star Christopher Eccleston speaks at TIFF
The roof is open
The view from the cheap seats
The view from our seats
Yum! Popcorn
Doh! Dropped popcorn on the floor
The CN Tower looms above
Waiting in line to buy terrible food at the concessions stands. No Fenway Franks or Boston Chowdah in sight.
Homemade chowdah made with love by family member.
What more can a guy ask for? Makes me not miss Boston so much.
Chowing down on a Hero Burger at the Sherway Gardens food court
A burrito fit for a king
A half eaten burrito
Mmm steak tacos
Late night salmon at Shoeless Joe’s. Not bad.
Roberto Luongo’s Jersey hangs at Shoeless Joe’s.

They beep when they back up!

Is it sad that one of my favourite places to eat in Toronto is Chipotle Mexican Grill? I mean, T.O. is home to a bevy of gourmet restaurants and we choose to eat at a fast casual dinning spot. We actually plan out our outings around this place. It helps that Chipotle is on Yonge and Eglinton which is near pretty much everything. Oh, as an aside, if you need sweet cheap kitchen stuff, check out Kitchen Stuff Plus on Yonge street, just a few blocks down from Chipotle.

Here’s how Chipotle works. You choose between burritos, tacos, burrito bowls and salads. Then you customize with your choice of meats or you go veggie like I did. Then come the fillers. Guacamole, salsa, cheese, beans, corn, fajita vegetables, lettuce and cilantro-lime rice. That rice is sick and one of the things that sets this place apart from Adobo or Qdoba. My veggie burrito was the size of a small poodle. Their slogan is “It’s not just a burrito. Its a foil-wrapped, hand-crafted, local farm supporting, food culture changing cylinder of deliciousness.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. If you’re in Toronto, go now. If you’re in Ottawa like me, petition. Cause I need to feed my addiction.

My veggie burrito
Zoom in on my veggie burrito. Looks gross close-up but when it’s in my mouth, it’s mmm.
My friend’s chicken burrito. She ate every bite!

Chipotle Mexican Grill on Urbanspoon