Jewish recipes

Cheesecake with Cherries

Cheesecake

Excerpted from The 100 Most Jewish Foods by Alana Newhouse (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2019. Photographs by Noah Fecks.

Tablet Magazine’s list of the 100 most Jewish foods is not about the most popular Jewish foods, or the tastiest, or even the most enduring. It’s a list of the most significant foods culturally and historically to the Jewish people, explored deeply with essays, recipes, stories, and context. Some of the dishes are no longer cooked at home, and some are not even dishes in the traditional sense (store-bought cereal and Stella D’oro cookies, for example).

The entire list is up for debate, which is what makes this book so much fun. Many of the foods are delicious (such as babka and shakshuka). Others make us wonder how they’ve survived as long as they have (such as unhatched chicken eggs and jellied calves’ feet). (more…)

Yeasted Rugelach

Rugelach

Photography by Michael Persico

For their first major book since the trailblazing Zahav, Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook go straight to the food of the people—the great dishes that are the soul of Israeli cuisine. Usually served from tiny eateries, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or market stalls, these specialties have passed from father to son or mother to daughter for generations. To find the best versions, the authors scoured bustling cities like Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and Haifa, and sleepy towns on mountaintops. They visited bakeries, juice carts, beaches, even weddings. (more…)

Cookbook Review: Feasting

Feasting: A new take on Jewish cooking

Many Jewish families continue the tradition of gathering to share a meal on Friday nights and holidays, but a new generation is changing the approach to traditional food. At the same time, the rest of the world is discovering the joys of Jewish cooking.

In Feasting, Amanda Ruben brings together her fresh takes on classic recipes, along with popular favourites from her contemporary café and deli, and her own busy family home.

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Cookbook Review: Little Book of Jewish Appetizers

First in a series of elegant little books exploring Jewish culinary traditions, this perfect hostess gift or self-treat takes us through the most social part of the meal: the appetizers. From nibbles and salads to dips and meatballs, more than 25 inspired, modern starters draw from global Jewish influences. Rounding out this lovely and informative resource are vibrant photographs and helpful sidebars featuring tips on how to build a Jewish cheese plate, what foods to buy rather than make, and more. Don’t expect reverence: with a wink and a nod to classic Jewish dishes, borscht has been reinvented as crostini and gefilte fish cleverly crisped into fritters. Dainty in size but mighty in delicious recipes, this book is a treasure for the nosh crowd. (more…)

Jewish ribs

Do you have a friend that has a stellar signature dish? I do. Latkes and ribs. Now the latkes part makes sense. My friend is jewish. The ribs part, not so much. But who am I to judge? He’s never shared the recipe. Doesn’t tell us how it’s done. But man, am I glad that on a semi-regular basis I’m invited take in his generous offerings. Check out the rib fest I recently partook in. Delicious!