Jewish recipes

My Mom’s Sweet-and-Sour Baked Eggplant

My Mom's Sweet-and-Sour Baked Eggplant, Excerpted from Shuk by Einat Admony & Janna Gur (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2019. Photographs by Quentin Bacon. Used with permission from the publisher.

My Mom’s Sweet-and-Sour Baked Eggplant, Excerpted from Shuk by Einat Admony & Janna Gur (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2019. Photographs by Quentin Bacon. Used with permission from the publisher.

Salad for breakfast. Vegetables every which way. Earthy hummus and the primal delight of mopping it up with a torn pita. Soul-satisfying stews and soups. The light-as-a-cloud texture of real couscous. A profound love for chicken. Pilafs, shakshukas, grilled meats, and fish from the glittering sea. The vibrant, utterly delicious (and healthy!) pleasures of eating food alive with spice, bright with lemon and olive oil, and showered with fresh herbs.

These are just some of the reasons why Israeli food is so of the moment—because this is how we want to eat today. And all of it—from the simplest chopped salad to nutty, soft, crumbly Tahini Shortbread Cookies—is found in SHUK: From Market to Table, the Heart of Israeli Home Cooking.

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Jelly Donuts

Sufganiyot (Jelly Donuts), The Jewish Cookbook by Leah Koenig, Photography by Evan Sung.

Sufganiyot (Jelly Donuts), The Jewish Cookbook by Leah Koenig, Photography by Evan Sung

Jewish cuisine exists all over the world. Shaped by the diaspora, Jewish food has inherently adapted and evolved to reflect the changing geographies and ingredients of its cooks, while also maintaining and honouring important customs and narratives.

Featuring over 400 dishes from Jewish communities around the world, The Jewish Cookbook is the most comprehensive collection of contemporary and traditional recipes for home cooks. Presenting food for everyday meals, celebrations, and special holidays, the book includes 11 chapters organized by occasion and dish.

Chicken Soup (aka Jewish Penicillin)

Chicken Soup, Kosher Style by Amy Rosen, Photography by Ryan Szulc

Chicken Soup, Kosher Style by Amy Rosen, Photography by Ryan Szulc

In the Jewish culture, as in many others, bubbes, saftas and nanas are the matriarchs of the kitchen and thus the rulers of the roost. They are culinary giants in quilted polyester muumuus and silk slippers who know how to make the Semitic linchpins cherished from childhood—the kugel, the gefilte fish, the matzah ball soup and the crispy-skinned roasted chicken. They all have their specialties but, of course, they won’t be around to feed us forever, and that will be a loss indeed. But it will be an even bigger loss if the recipes we grew up on pass away with them, along with those special connections to our past.

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Chocolate Miso Babka

Chocolate MIso Babka

Chocolate Miso Babka, Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments © 2019 by Kirsten Shockey and Christopher Shockey. Photograph by © Dina Avila.

Best-selling fermentation authors Kirsten and Christopher Shockey explore a whole new realm of probiotic superfoods with Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments. This in-depth handbook offers accessible, step-by-step techniques for fermenting beans and grains in the home kitchen. (more…)

Cheesecake with Cherries

Cheesecake

Excerpted from The 100 Most Jewish Foods by Alana Newhouse (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2019. Photographs by Noah Fecks.

Tablet Magazine’s list of the 100 most Jewish foods is not about the most popular Jewish foods, or the tastiest, or even the most enduring. It’s a list of the most significant foods culturally and historically to the Jewish people, explored deeply with essays, recipes, stories, and context. Some of the dishes are no longer cooked at home, and some are not even dishes in the traditional sense (store-bought cereal and Stella D’oro cookies, for example).

The entire list is up for debate, which is what makes this book so much fun. Many of the foods are delicious (such as babka and shakshuka). Others make us wonder how they’ve survived as long as they have (such as unhatched chicken eggs and jellied calves’ feet). (more…)

Yeasted Rugelach

Rugelach

Photography by Michael Persico

For their first major book since the trailblazing Zahav, Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook go straight to the food of the people—the great dishes that are the soul of Israeli cuisine. Usually served from tiny eateries, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or market stalls, these specialties have passed from father to son or mother to daughter for generations. To find the best versions, the authors scoured bustling cities like Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and Haifa, and sleepy towns on mountaintops. They visited bakeries, juice carts, beaches, even weddings. (more…)

Cookbook Review: Feasting

Feasting: A new take on Jewish cooking

Many Jewish families continue the tradition of gathering to share a meal on Friday nights and holidays, but a new generation is changing the approach to traditional food. At the same time, the rest of the world is discovering the joys of Jewish cooking.

In Feasting, Amanda Ruben brings together her fresh takes on classic recipes, along with popular favourites from her contemporary café and deli, and her own busy family home.

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Cookbook Review: Little Book of Jewish Appetizers

First in a series of elegant little books exploring Jewish culinary traditions, this perfect hostess gift or self-treat takes us through the most social part of the meal: the appetizers. From nibbles and salads to dips and meatballs, more than 25 inspired, modern starters draw from global Jewish influences. Rounding out this lovely and informative resource are vibrant photographs and helpful sidebars featuring tips on how to build a Jewish cheese plate, what foods to buy rather than make, and more. Don’t expect reverence: with a wink and a nod to classic Jewish dishes, borscht has been reinvented as crostini and gefilte fish cleverly crisped into fritters. Dainty in size but mighty in delicious recipes, this book is a treasure for the nosh crowd. (more…)

Jewish ribs

Do you have a friend that has a stellar signature dish? I do. Latkes and ribs. Now the latkes part makes sense. My friend is jewish. The ribs part, not so much. But who am I to judge? He’s never shared the recipe. Doesn’t tell us how it’s done. But man, am I glad that on a semi-regular basis I’m invited take in his generous offerings. Check out the rib fest I recently partook in. Delicious!